MFA calendar Term 2

Week 1: Project Proposals and Discussion (focus on essay) (HP)

Week 2: 17/01, Project Proposal and Discussion (focus on practice) (LB)

Week 1: Project Proposals and Discussion (focus on essay) (HP)

Week 2: 17/01, Project Proposal and Discussion (focus on practice) (LB)

Week 3: 24/01, Reflective Practice Workshop (HP)

Week 4: No session, Transmediale (Readings and Conference reflections)

Week 5: 7/02, Presentation: Project in pieces – series of mini-projects to realise some of the functionality that you will need. (assessed)  (LB)

Week 6: 14/02, Mapping Research Entanglements Workshop (HP)

Week 7: 21/02 Skeleton Project Presentation and Technical Support Session (LB)

Essay Draft Due: Monday 26th February  (assessed)

Week 8: 28/02, Individual Tutorials (essay feedback) (HP)

Week 9: 7/03, Prototype A  – Presentation for the MA continued development of your project so that it fully realises some of the features which you previously sketched out.(assessed) (LB)

Week 10: 14/03, Prototype B and Technical Support Session (LB)

Final Essay Draft Due: 19/03/2018 (assessed)

Week 11: 21/03, Individual Tutorials (essay feedback).

Prototype C – Work in Progress Showing – mid – late May (assessed)

FINAL Essay Hand-in: 07/05/2018

 

Digital flows

Network -Hide

01/25/2018

> Explore Steganography,  and embedding signal into Wearable Objects,

01/20/2018

State Machines is a programme of activities devoted to the investigation of new relationships between states, citizens and the stateless made possible by emerging technologies. Focussing on how such technologies impact identity and citizenship, digital labour and finance

Every time a smartphone powers up, their user is tied inextricably into data, laws and flowing bytes to different countries. Their every personal expression is framed and mediated by digital platforms which now include those operating new kinds of currencies, financial exchange, and labour relations that bypass corporations and governments.

Meanwhile these same technologies increase governmental powers of surveillance, allow corporations to extract ever more complex working arrangements, and, although seemingly the epitome of globalization, they do little to slow the construction of actual walls along actual borders.

We ask how might the digital subjects of today become active, engaged, and effective digital citizens of tomorrow?

State Machines now launches an open call for a new commissioned artistic project.. What kind of Project ? :

  • efforts and actions that resist new enclosures and preserve mobilities, freedom of assembly and other hard-won rights
  • unintended impacts of digital flows on physical bodies, places and infrastructure
  • shifting techniques for controls and flows of information and finance by governments, private companies and individuals;
  • public deliberation and free speech in social media – algorithmic and human corruption and its counterforces;
  • new tools and data for wrangling the personal and political impacts of cloud computing

The call is open to artists, technologists, activists, inventors and individuals, groups and hybrid human- artificial intelligence collaborations.

We are interested in all art forms and actions that can be encountered and experienced across networks, online and in physical exhibition. We welcome diverse viewpoints, experimental and playful approaches.

Fading Memories The social, political and economic future is determined globally by the evolution of digital technologies. The boundaries between the analogue and digital spheres have become increasingly blurred, and the digital has become an integral part of our actual reality. Fading memories devoted a year of international events to the themes of privacy and data ownership in the digital age against the backdrop of developments in the countries of north-western Europe.

 

What we give away when we log on to a public WiFi network experiment of creating a fake network and stealing data from visiting mobile phone in public space.The idea that public WiFi networks are not secure is not exactly news. It is, however, news that can’t be repeated often enough. There are currently more than 1.43 billion smartphone users worldwide and more than 150 million smartphone owners in the U.S. In the U.S., more than 92 million American adults own a tablet and more than 155 million The US census has numbers. own a laptop. Each year the worldwide demand for more laptops and tablets increases. In 2013, an estimated 206 million tablets and 180 million laptops were sold worldwide. Probably everyone with a portable device has once been connected to a public WiFi network: while having a coffee, on the train, or at a hotel. by Wouter Slotboom

> display the facts, rather than the content of counting smartphones and simulating their behaviour/ connections with K cells?

invisible-internet-of-things

Vladan Joler -ShareLab

Exploitation Forensics. Interview with Vladan Joler

The Human Fabric of the Facebook Pyramid

K- cells-Knitted cells – MFA year 2 practical project

 

 

01/25/2018

the cells, could functions as kinetic drawing bots:

01/10/2018

 In relation to my essay proposal about the  ”NetWork : the Ultimate Mask “
Find the Poetic Space of the Network , I have the intention is to build up some Knitted cells units.  I would like to be able to stitch them together to make either a costume , a quilt , a mask,  a 3D sculpture  , a sensitive environment, or reactive bodies for puppets…

“Rules” :

  • The cells will have different functions , and different structures . They could store visual memories . They could produce or record sounds, be thermo sensitives.  They could produce lights etc…
  • Combined and stiched together they form a body. Each of this unit has its own functions and life, stich together they form a collective and have a collective behaviour. Individually they have a autonomous behaviour.
  • Like puppets can do one thing , dancing versus walking, or a mask is expressing one quality ( neutral, clown, buffon ….)  each type of K cells have limited functions , either data feed, ligth or sound. their design should reflect this particular feature.
  • Decide whether together they are stronger or weaker ? amplification process? they can also relate to each other remotely ie not stitch together.

Strategy

  • >Build K cells in electronics and transpose into soft e textile
  • > Build two families KL, knitted light fiber cells .and KA knitted audio fiber cells

    • Wearable Antennae Speaker FM Transmitter (KA)
  •  Puppetry and mask making process of animating objects
  • then WA weaved audio cells
  • combine the two families in a collective structure
    yep
    Birdy, found objects puppet by theatredu1k
Mona Luison
credit : Mona Louison

“Variables and functions”:

To achieve the design of each family of K cells,  I will use ( list to be completed)

  • mapping technology ( Max/ MSP, Mad Mapper)
  • generative code to find interesting patterns for each type of cells
generative sin pattern in Processing by SRQ
 

Luce - Lucette & Lulu

Essay planning

Notes from Helen Pritchard 15th december

  • –  Invasion of the body by the network
  • –  Exploitation of the body of the network
  • –  performativity of the network
  • –  Relations of power
  • –  Which side of the string are you – is there a side in entanglements?
  • –  Automation
  • –  Entanglement – Karen Barad
  • –  Body and Society Journal
  • –  Technology, Culture and Society Journal
  • –  Off the Network – https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/off-the-network

 

–       Anna Munster’s work
–       Erin Manning’s work on relationscapes

Make the invisible visible-crafting the digital

    • Andrew Prescott
    • Datacatcher , http://www.datacatcher.org/
    • Justin Marshall, Jon Rogers and Jayne Wallace “Andrew Prescott’s piece, where he writes ‘Networks can enable the local to be linked into the wider world, but still allow a distinctive local character.’ This sensitivity or attunement to the ‘local’ when creating connections between people, things and places through the digital, is something that we recognise as a characteristic of a craft approach, it enables people, places and their ‘things’ to retain their particular and idiosyncratic textures. We know that whatever happens, we’re going to walk into our digital futures, this much is certain. Our proposition to you is whether we take the choice to create a crafted digital future or something else altogether. With this in mind, let’s look at what this means from the two perspectives we outlined at the start of our reflection and why this matters to us. Craft and pre-industrial production and in relation to a sensitivity to things, people and process that focuses on the individual and the idiosyncratic. This is in contrast to the current model of global infinites in terms of production networks, materials, processes and homogeneity of form.”
    • Irene Posch

Networked Affect from the Digital Self to the Avatar Bodies

Look at the Other at Ugly Duck
BookS

Networked Affect ” Edited by Ken Hillis, Susanna Paasonen and Michael Petit

Main Library collection 004.6 NET

The contributors investigate networked affect in terms of intensity, sensation, and value. They explore online intensities that range from Tumblr practices in LGBTQ

communities to visceral reactions to animated avatars; examine the affective materiality of software in such platforms as steampunk culture and nonprofit altporn; and analyze the ascription of value to online activities including the GTD (“getting things done”) movement and the accumulation of personal digital materials.

Bodies in Technology by Don Ihde

Main Library collection 303.4833 IHD

exploration of the ways cyberspace affects human experience. abstract Reviewed by Maureen Nappi

Ihde is interested in exploring how our sense of embodied self is transformed via contemporary technology”….”Here Ihde seizes on the distinction between the real and the virtual, and from that distinction he develops both a phenomenology of embodiment (whereby technology corrects or enhances the perceptual faculties of the body) and a phenomenology of disembodiment (whereby technology projects and objectifies the [End Page 837] body). Ihde is particularly interested in disembodiment because it underlies the notion of a “virtual” body, which involves a kind of visualization of the body as generated by various technologies. in-class “thought experiment” that he uses to elicit his students to articulate their sense of the non-technological virtual body. The assignment: to imagine themselves jumping out of an airplane. Their responses, Ihde points out, fall into one of two possible categories: either the student imagines an “embodied” perspective [End Page 77] of self as actor, which Ihde refers to as the “here-body”—a present-tense version of a “‘be here now’ body,” -or- the student imagines a disembodied perspective of self as observer of the self as actor, that is, “already a kind of virtual body in a nontechnological projection.” 

The Fabric of Interface Mobile Media, Design, and Gender By Stephen Monteiro

Monteiro goes on to argue that the capacity of textile metaphors to describe computing (weaving code, threaded discussions, zipped files, software patches, switch fabrics) represents deeper connections between digital communication and what has been called “homecraft” or “women’s work.

Connecting networked media to practices that seem alien to media technologies, Monteiro identifies handicraft and textile techniques in the production of software and hardware, and cites the punched cards that were read by a loom’s rods as a primitive form of computer memory; examines textual and visual discourses that position the digital image as a malleable fabric across its production, access, and use; compares the digital labor of liking, linking, and tagging to such earlier forms of collective production as quilting bees and piecework; and describes how the convergence of intimacy and handiwork at the screen interface, combined with needlecraft aesthetics, genders networked culture and activities in unexpected ways.

Software and Memory

New media thrives on cycles of obsolescence and renewal: from celebrations of cyber-everything to Y2K, from the dot-com bust to the next big things—mobile mobs, Web 3.0, cloud computing. In Programmed Visions, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun argues that these cycles result in part from the ways in which new media encapsulates a logic of programmability. New media proliferates “programmed visions,” which seek to shape and predict—even embody—a future based on past data. These programmed visions have also made computers, based on metaphor, metaphors for metaphor itself, for a general logic of substitutability.

Chun argues that the clarity offered by software as metaphor should make us pause, because software also engenders a profound sense of ignorance: who knows what lurks behind our smiling interfaces, behind the objects we click and manipulate? The combination of what can be seen and not seen, known (knowable) and not known—its separation of interface from algorithm and software from hardware—makes it a powerful metaphor for everything we believe is invisible yet generates visible, logical effects, from genetics to the invisible hand of the market, from ideology to culture.

ArticleS

Article Understanding your digital Self by Tamara J Hicks Psy.D.

Darknets

(Wikipedia ) in general may be used for various reasons.

Starting to render

After Session 3 with Helen Pritchard,

sort out all that matters in circle around The Subject :

Network, Visual dominance , Identity, Mask, Memory, Futur, VR, Affect, Perception, Body/Brain, Ubiquity, Interaction, Power/Control and Bio Politics, Creative process, Objectification, Potential, Expectation, Tension, the Other, the Self, Mirror, Transversality, Feed, Shape Memory, Hyperobject

and find that the title of the essay could be … the Network as the Ultimate Mask (of the Self) or the Mask of the Network