Research Methodology

 

 C.R. KOTHARI,  Research methodology and technics ,2004, NEW AGE INTERNATIONAL (P) LIMITED, PUBLISHERS

“Thus, when we talk of research methodology
we not only talk of the research methods but also consider the logic behind the methods we use in the context of our research study and explain why we are using a particular method or technique and why we are not using others so that research results are capgable of being evaluated either by the researcher himself or by others”

Transmediale 17- Network and New Media

In conclusion to her talk with Richard Grusin and Clemens Apprich at Transmediale 2017 in Berlin, theorist of digital media and Prof Wendy Chun challenges artists to create viable alternatives in response to the increased networking of our digital world and the elusiveness of mediation.
Invoking art as an “agent perturbateur” is interesting as it calls for challenging established rules before creating as it means chaos before emergence of a new order. In a very Simondian way, it is looking for tensions. It is waking up from the delusions we have created ourselves and break the infinite feedback loop we are living in. Life is not linear , seldom logical. Why trying to fit so hard in a logical system which leads ultimately to segregation? Chun ’s answer is homophily or “tendency of individuals to associate and bond with similar others”(Wikipedia).

W.Chun defines how networks are structured by habits and homophily and how habits are shaped and embodied into a monogamous network environment based on similarities , likes and dislikes. “We become our machines”. As Richard Grusin tells us too, not only the present but also all potential futures are pre-mediated and expectations are pre-formatted by algorithms. To reduce segregation induced by homophily, W.Chun invites us to foster another type of network where clusters would be mutual indifferences rather than likeness.
“Homophily create clusters, it is about collaborative filtering, similarities breeds connection. What matters, it is that people likes you, who follows you. Network not only finds connections but also create them for us”.
According to W.Chun, we are living in a world auto-fed by continuous updates ignited by crisis over habits and dependencies embodied in our environment. We are“creatures of the update. To be is to be updated: to update and to be subjected to the update.” (Chun , Habitual New Media, p12). She also warns us that updates means erase the old and replace it by the new. “Things no longer updated are things no longer used, usable, or cared for, even though updates often ‘save’ things by literally”.

According to W.Chun, in a world defined by networks, we are like any other variables : defined or used by functions. As such, in order to create viable alternatives, not only we would have to resist to homophily but also our needs for belonging and our quest for a definite identity /value.
W.Chun recognizes creativity’s existence in the network system and quotes Elisabeth Grosz : “Habits enables stability, which in turn gives us the time and space needed to be truly creative: without habit there could be no thinking, no creativity and no freedom.” But I would say, not only. Chaos is also another reliable source for creativity.
If we were to create another system, where clusters are not relying on similarities, it could be an open system where input could have no output, where the equation input/output is broken, a system where the traveling salesman problem is solved by optimising the order of visits to several places in a way that the total route is not as short as possible, but the longest.
It would be a permanent chaotic process, where solutions are morphing from one to another, not an infinite loop of updates, but infinite explorations, not only going forward and vertically but also backwards, transversally and horizontally, because the world is not binary, the world is wonderfully messy (Kathleen Vohs). Certainly, not everyone is ready for this. As W.Chun and R.Grusin suggested, artists could find alternatives to the over-controlled networks system as chaos is part of their creative process. About pre-mediated expectations and order over messiness : creativity flows even better when there is no expectations.

Other propositions to break the loop and paths for researching :

Continue reading Transmediale 17- Network and New Media

Alternatives to increased networking of the digital media, Chaos and creativity

In conclusion to her talk with Richard Grusin and Clemens Apprich at Transmediale 2017 in Berlin, theorist of digital media and Prof Wendy Chun challenges artists to create viable alternatives in response to the increased networking of our digital world and the elusiveness of mediation.
Invoking art as an “agent perturbateur” is interesting as it calls for challenging established rules before creating as it means chaos before emergence of a new order. In a very Simondian way, it is looking for tensions. It is waking up from the delusions we have created ourselves and break the infinite feedback loop we are living in. Life is not linear , seldom logical. Why trying to fit so hard in a logical system which leads ultimately to segregation? Chun ’s answer is homophily or “tendency of individuals to associate and bond with similar others”(Wikipedia).

W.Chun defines how networks are structured by habits and homophily and how habits are shaped and embodied into a monogamous network environment based on similarities , likes and dislikes. “We become our machines”. As Richard Grusin tells us too, not only the present but also all potential futures are pre-mediated and expectations are pre-formatted by algorithms. To reduce segregation induced by homophily, W.Chun invites us to foster another type of network where clusters would be mutual indifferences rather than likeness.
“Homophily create clusters, it is about collaborative filtering, similarities breeds connection. What matters, it is that people likes you, who follows you. Network not only finds connections but also create them for us”.
According to W.Chun, we are living in a world auto-fed by continuous updates ignited by crisis over habits and dependencies embodied in our environment. We are“creatures of the update. To be is to be updated: to update and to be subjected to the update.” (Chun , Habitual New Media, p12). She also warns us that updates means erase the old and replace it by the new. “Things no longer updated are things no longer used, usable, or cared for, even though updates often ‘save’ things by literally”.

According to W.Chun, in a world defined by networks, we are like any other variables : defined or used by functions. As such, in order to create viable alternatives, not only we would have to resist to homophily but also our needs for belonging and our quest for a definite identity /value.
W.Chun recognizes creativity’s existence in the network system and quotes Elisabeth Grosz : “Habits enables stability, which in turn gives us the time and space needed to be truly creative: without habit there could be no thinking, no creativity and no freedom.” But I would say, not only. Chaos is also another reliable source for creativity.
If we were to create another system, where clusters are not relying on similarities, it could be an open system where input could have no output, where the equation input/output is broken, a system where the traveling salesman problem is solved by optimising the order of visits to several places in a way that the total route is not as short as possible, but the longest.
It would be a permanent chaotic process, where solutions are morphing from one to another, not an infinite loop of updates, but infinite explorations, not only going forward and vertically but also backwards, transversally and horizontally, because the world is not binary, the world is wonderfully messy (Kathleen Vohs). Certainly, not everyone is ready for this. As W.Chun and R.Grusin suggested, artists could find alternatives to the over-controlled networks system as chaos is part of their creative process. About pre-mediated expectations and order over messiness : creativity flows even better when there is no expectations.

Other propositions to break the loop and paths for researching :

Continue reading Alternatives to increased networking of the digital media, Chaos and creativity

Ethnography

Alien Agency

Ethnography and Computational Art by Christian Slater – session 2 MFA readings

What is “material agency -what the world does rather than is” is illustrated through three experimental and ethographic stories he shared with other artist researchers. Matter of the world around us which lead to experiential and affect, for the artist entangled with his material.

Slater shares with us the creative process of three artist/ researchers projects : acoustic life of the city, make move muscle cells out of the body, create a sensorium. 

Cellular Vitality.  Chapter II

Continue reading Ethnography

Media Archeology

Indigenous Circuits: Navajo Women and the Racialization of Early Electronic Manufacture
by Lisa Nakamura

 

Nakamura draws from “ A cyborg Manifesto”(1) where Dona Haraway reminds us that “ labor is commodified and extracted , often without compensation for labourer, within digital culture”. In her article, Nakamura is focusing on how Haraway raised awareness about “gendering and racializing of bodies as well as on computer hardware itself” . Exploring Navajo women ’s input in the growth and the success of Fairchild SemiConductor company, Nakamura answers to Haraway’ s call to analyse ”digital media , not only seeing its image but seeing into it” and see the “women of colour workers…integrated within the circuit of techno culture” . Continue reading Media Archeology