Artistic Research

  • Artistic Research methods by Jane Prophet : http://www.neuro-memento-mori.com/teaching/category/research-methods/

Action Based Research  by Kemmis :

  1. Planning in order to initiate change
  2. Implementing the change (acting) and observing the process of implementation and consequences
  3. Reflecting on processes of change and re-planning
  4. Acting and observing
  5. Reflecting

Artistic Research, by Friedman about challenges for PhD students and supervisors

Embodied Technologies by Sullivan “argue that the artistic approaches employed using embodied methodologies can be considered as a way to make meaning and that especially within participatory research, these approaches can strengthen validity. ”

  • Networking , conferences and seminars

http://newmaterialism.eu/, Networking European Scholarship on ‘How Matter Comes to Matter’. 

http://sarconference2018.org/ARWEI_SCHEDULE.pdf

  • Samples of artistic research ouput :

critter-compiler-prototype– by Helen Pritchard

 

Vocable Code

Material Aktiv Denken

  • Samples of Product based Research

Digital Lace, Sara Robertson and Sarah Taylor

Urban jacket Pablo Cesar

OpenFood Open Innovation Models, Sharon  Baurley

 

Puppetry articles and readings

Kenneth Gross : Puppet: An Essay on Uncanny Life Paperback – University of Chicago -16 Oct 2012

https://www.rochester.edu/pr/Review/V74N5/pdf/0304_inrev_puppets.pdf

http://scholarship.claremont.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1050&context=mimejournal

Aesthetics of the Puppet – European Romanticism to the Avant-Garde

“Priority given to the visual and to sound is essential for all forms deriving from the art of the puppet.”

Myth of the Puppet – A Western Perspective

 

Research Methodology

 

 C.R. KOTHARI,  Research methodology and technics ,2004, NEW AGE INTERNATIONAL (P) LIMITED, PUBLISHERS

“Thus, when we talk of research methodology
we not only talk of the research methods but also consider the logic behind the methods we use in the context of our research study and explain why we are using a particular method or technique and why we are not using others so that research results are capgable of being evaluated either by the researcher himself or by others”

Networked Affect from the Digital Self to the Avatar Bodies

Look at the Other at Ugly Duck
BookS

Networked Affect ” Edited by Ken Hillis, Susanna Paasonen and Michael Petit

Main Library collection 004.6 NET

The contributors investigate networked affect in terms of intensity, sensation, and value. They explore online intensities that range from Tumblr practices in LGBTQ

communities to visceral reactions to animated avatars; examine the affective materiality of software in such platforms as steampunk culture and nonprofit altporn; and analyze the ascription of value to online activities including the GTD (“getting things done”) movement and the accumulation of personal digital materials.

Bodies in Technology by Don Ihde

Main Library collection 303.4833 IHD

exploration of the ways cyberspace affects human experience. abstract Reviewed by Maureen Nappi

Ihde is interested in exploring how our sense of embodied self is transformed via contemporary technology”….”Here Ihde seizes on the distinction between the real and the virtual, and from that distinction he develops both a phenomenology of embodiment (whereby technology corrects or enhances the perceptual faculties of the body) and a phenomenology of disembodiment (whereby technology projects and objectifies the [End Page 837] body). Ihde is particularly interested in disembodiment because it underlies the notion of a “virtual” body, which involves a kind of visualization of the body as generated by various technologies. in-class “thought experiment” that he uses to elicit his students to articulate their sense of the non-technological virtual body. The assignment: to imagine themselves jumping out of an airplane. Their responses, Ihde points out, fall into one of two possible categories: either the student imagines an “embodied” perspective [End Page 77] of self as actor, which Ihde refers to as the “here-body”—a present-tense version of a “‘be here now’ body,” -or- the student imagines a disembodied perspective of self as observer of the self as actor, that is, “already a kind of virtual body in a nontechnological projection.” 

The Fabric of Interface Mobile Media, Design, and Gender By Stephen Monteiro

Monteiro goes on to argue that the capacity of textile metaphors to describe computing (weaving code, threaded discussions, zipped files, software patches, switch fabrics) represents deeper connections between digital communication and what has been called “homecraft” or “women’s work.

Connecting networked media to practices that seem alien to media technologies, Monteiro identifies handicraft and textile techniques in the production of software and hardware, and cites the punched cards that were read by a loom’s rods as a primitive form of computer memory; examines textual and visual discourses that position the digital image as a malleable fabric across its production, access, and use; compares the digital labor of liking, linking, and tagging to such earlier forms of collective production as quilting bees and piecework; and describes how the convergence of intimacy and handiwork at the screen interface, combined with needlecraft aesthetics, genders networked culture and activities in unexpected ways.

Software and Memory

New media thrives on cycles of obsolescence and renewal: from celebrations of cyber-everything to Y2K, from the dot-com bust to the next big things—mobile mobs, Web 3.0, cloud computing. In Programmed Visions, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun argues that these cycles result in part from the ways in which new media encapsulates a logic of programmability. New media proliferates “programmed visions,” which seek to shape and predict—even embody—a future based on past data. These programmed visions have also made computers, based on metaphor, metaphors for metaphor itself, for a general logic of substitutability.

Chun argues that the clarity offered by software as metaphor should make us pause, because software also engenders a profound sense of ignorance: who knows what lurks behind our smiling interfaces, behind the objects we click and manipulate? The combination of what can be seen and not seen, known (knowable) and not known—its separation of interface from algorithm and software from hardware—makes it a powerful metaphor for everything we believe is invisible yet generates visible, logical effects, from genetics to the invisible hand of the market, from ideology to culture.

ArticleS

Article Understanding your digital Self by Tamara J Hicks Psy.D.

Darknets

(Wikipedia ) in general may be used for various reasons.

Transmediale 17- Network and New Media

In conclusion to her talk with Richard Grusin and Clemens Apprich at Transmediale 2017 in Berlin, theorist of digital media and Prof Wendy Chun challenges artists to create viable alternatives in response to the increased networking of our digital world and the elusiveness of mediation.
Invoking art as an “agent perturbateur” is interesting as it calls for challenging established rules before creating as it means chaos before emergence of a new order. In a very Simondian way, it is looking for tensions. It is waking up from the delusions we have created ourselves and break the infinite feedback loop we are living in. Life is not linear , seldom logical. Why trying to fit so hard in a logical system which leads ultimately to segregation? Chun ’s answer is homophily or “tendency of individuals to associate and bond with similar others”(Wikipedia).

W.Chun defines how networks are structured by habits and homophily and how habits are shaped and embodied into a monogamous network environment based on similarities , likes and dislikes. “We become our machines”. As Richard Grusin tells us too, not only the present but also all potential futures are pre-mediated and expectations are pre-formatted by algorithms. To reduce segregation induced by homophily, W.Chun invites us to foster another type of network where clusters would be mutual indifferences rather than likeness.
“Homophily create clusters, it is about collaborative filtering, similarities breeds connection. What matters, it is that people likes you, who follows you. Network not only finds connections but also create them for us”.
According to W.Chun, we are living in a world auto-fed by continuous updates ignited by crisis over habits and dependencies embodied in our environment. We are“creatures of the update. To be is to be updated: to update and to be subjected to the update.” (Chun , Habitual New Media, p12). She also warns us that updates means erase the old and replace it by the new. “Things no longer updated are things no longer used, usable, or cared for, even though updates often ‘save’ things by literally”.

According to W.Chun, in a world defined by networks, we are like any other variables : defined or used by functions. As such, in order to create viable alternatives, not only we would have to resist to homophily but also our needs for belonging and our quest for a definite identity /value.
W.Chun recognizes creativity’s existence in the network system and quotes Elisabeth Grosz : “Habits enables stability, which in turn gives us the time and space needed to be truly creative: without habit there could be no thinking, no creativity and no freedom.” But I would say, not only. Chaos is also another reliable source for creativity.
If we were to create another system, where clusters are not relying on similarities, it could be an open system where input could have no output, where the equation input/output is broken, a system where the traveling salesman problem is solved by optimising the order of visits to several places in a way that the total route is not as short as possible, but the longest.
It would be a permanent chaotic process, where solutions are morphing from one to another, not an infinite loop of updates, but infinite explorations, not only going forward and vertically but also backwards, transversally and horizontally, because the world is not binary, the world is wonderfully messy (Kathleen Vohs). Certainly, not everyone is ready for this. As W.Chun and R.Grusin suggested, artists could find alternatives to the over-controlled networks system as chaos is part of their creative process. About pre-mediated expectations and order over messiness : creativity flows even better when there is no expectations.

Other propositions to break the loop and paths for researching :

Continue reading Transmediale 17- Network and New Media

Alternatives to increased networking of the digital media, Chaos and creativity

In conclusion to her talk with Richard Grusin and Clemens Apprich at Transmediale 2017 in Berlin, theorist of digital media and Prof Wendy Chun challenges artists to create viable alternatives in response to the increased networking of our digital world and the elusiveness of mediation.
Invoking art as an “agent perturbateur” is interesting as it calls for challenging established rules before creating as it means chaos before emergence of a new order. In a very Simondian way, it is looking for tensions. It is waking up from the delusions we have created ourselves and break the infinite feedback loop we are living in. Life is not linear , seldom logical. Why trying to fit so hard in a logical system which leads ultimately to segregation? Chun ’s answer is homophily or “tendency of individuals to associate and bond with similar others”(Wikipedia).

W.Chun defines how networks are structured by habits and homophily and how habits are shaped and embodied into a monogamous network environment based on similarities , likes and dislikes. “We become our machines”. As Richard Grusin tells us too, not only the present but also all potential futures are pre-mediated and expectations are pre-formatted by algorithms. To reduce segregation induced by homophily, W.Chun invites us to foster another type of network where clusters would be mutual indifferences rather than likeness.
“Homophily create clusters, it is about collaborative filtering, similarities breeds connection. What matters, it is that people likes you, who follows you. Network not only finds connections but also create them for us”.
According to W.Chun, we are living in a world auto-fed by continuous updates ignited by crisis over habits and dependencies embodied in our environment. We are“creatures of the update. To be is to be updated: to update and to be subjected to the update.” (Chun , Habitual New Media, p12). She also warns us that updates means erase the old and replace it by the new. “Things no longer updated are things no longer used, usable, or cared for, even though updates often ‘save’ things by literally”.

According to W.Chun, in a world defined by networks, we are like any other variables : defined or used by functions. As such, in order to create viable alternatives, not only we would have to resist to homophily but also our needs for belonging and our quest for a definite identity /value.
W.Chun recognizes creativity’s existence in the network system and quotes Elisabeth Grosz : “Habits enables stability, which in turn gives us the time and space needed to be truly creative: without habit there could be no thinking, no creativity and no freedom.” But I would say, not only. Chaos is also another reliable source for creativity.
If we were to create another system, where clusters are not relying on similarities, it could be an open system where input could have no output, where the equation input/output is broken, a system where the traveling salesman problem is solved by optimising the order of visits to several places in a way that the total route is not as short as possible, but the longest.
It would be a permanent chaotic process, where solutions are morphing from one to another, not an infinite loop of updates, but infinite explorations, not only going forward and vertically but also backwards, transversally and horizontally, because the world is not binary, the world is wonderfully messy (Kathleen Vohs). Certainly, not everyone is ready for this. As W.Chun and R.Grusin suggested, artists could find alternatives to the over-controlled networks system as chaos is part of their creative process. About pre-mediated expectations and order over messiness : creativity flows even better when there is no expectations.

Other propositions to break the loop and paths for researching :

Continue reading Alternatives to increased networking of the digital media, Chaos and creativity

Ethnography

Alien Agency

Ethnography and Computational Art by Christian Slater – session 2 MFA readings

What is “material agency -what the world does rather than is” is illustrated through three experimental and ethographic stories he shared with other artist researchers. Matter of the world around us which lead to experiential and affect, for the artist entangled with his material.

Slater shares with us the creative process of three artist/ researchers projects : acoustic life of the city, make move muscle cells out of the body, create a sensorium. 

Cellular Vitality.  Chapter II

Continue reading Ethnography

Media Archeology

Indigenous Circuits: Navajo Women and the Racialization of Early Electronic Manufacture
by Lisa Nakamura

 

Nakamura draws from “ A cyborg Manifesto”(1) where Dona Haraway reminds us that “ labor is commodified and extracted , often without compensation for labourer, within digital culture”. In her article, Nakamura is focusing on how Haraway raised awareness about “gendering and racializing of bodies as well as on computer hardware itself” . Exploring Navajo women ’s input in the growth and the success of Fairchild SemiConductor company, Nakamura answers to Haraway’ s call to analyse ”digital media , not only seeing its image but seeing into it” and see the “women of colour workers…integrated within the circuit of techno culture” . Continue reading Media Archeology